Forums Science Assignment Help Biology How does the colour of flowers affect their ability to pollinate?

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    kritinidhi
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    How does the colour of flowers affect their ability to pollinate?

    #16403

    kritinidhi
    Member

    Pollination is a process of transferring pollen grains from male anther of the flower to female reproductive organ stigma. Thereby, enabling fertilization to take place. Like all living organisms, seed plants have a single major purpose: to pass their genetic information on to the next generation.

    Pollination is a vital process of nature in food growing processes. In this process, pollinators play an important role. A pollinator is an insect or animal which moves the pollen from male anther to stigma. This helps bring about fertilization of the ovules in the flower.
    Flower colour acts as sensory signals that attract pollinators by ‘advertising’ the quality and quantity of the floral rewards. Floral colour not only differs among flowering plants but also varies upon changes during the flower life. Quisqualis Indica is a tropical climber that undergoes a floral colour change from white to pink and then pink to red. According to a recent study, it has been shown that floral colour change is related to increased nectar secretion and a very strong scent, which at last results in the pollinator attraction.

    Flower colour significance also depends on the specific pollinator. For example- bees are attracted to bright blue and violet colours. Hummingbirds prefer red, pink, fuchsia or purple flowers. While, butterflies are attracted towards yellow, orange, pink and red flowers. Flower with more attracting qualities has more chances of pollination. While old and dull flowers have fewer chances of pollination.

    Hence, at last, we can conclude that colour of flowers really affects their ability to pollinate.

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